Notes from An Alien

~ Explorations In Reading, Writing, and Publishing ~

Tag Archives: freelance writing

Freelance Writing Challenges


Are you a writer who needs more money?

Writing for Money

Image courtesy of Caltiva Creatividad ~ http://www.freeimages.com/profile/caltiva

My experience shows that most writers need more.

I wonder how many feel they’re capable of doing some freelancing…

Here are a few past posts I’ve written.

Freelance Lies . . .

Are Fiction Writers Capable of Freelancing?

Scratch, Scratch, Who’s Got The Money?

But, to get more specific about how to prepare for freelance writing, I’ll reference an article from Living Well, Spending Less called, How to Make Money as a Freelance Writer.

Naturally, if you have a strong interest in freelancing, I suggest you go read the full article; but, here are the bullet points:

1. Determine Your Writing Niches
2. Start Acquiring Samples
3. Establish a Web Home Base
4. Develop a Pitch
5. Pitch, Pitch, Pitch

Obviously, listing the skeleton like that makes it look simple, even if full of work…

Reading the article will nicely fill-in the experience and expertise of author, Ruth Soukup.

Of course, to freelance you need time; and, if you’re a creative writer, you may feel you just don’t have enough time.

Try this article from Make A Living WritingHow I Found 70 Extra Hours a Month to Boost My Freelance Writing Career.

But, even with the time to do that freelancing, you may need some help

Freelancers Union has the article, 5 Free Online Tools for Freelance Writers.

And, The Write Life has, 9 Online Gold Mines for Finding Paid Freelance Writing Jobs.

To round-out this primer on freelance writing challenges, I’ll quote from that first, past post of mine, Freelance Lies:

#1 – Freelance writers must have deep tech/industry experience

#2 – Freelance writers need an English or journalism degree to be good

#3 – Freelance writers outsource the work and sit back collecting your money

#4 – Freelance writers are schedule-free spirits

#5 – Freelance writers have an easy job

#6 – Freelance writers overcharge

#7 – Freelance writers have low overhead so it’s all fun and profit

If you’ve done freelance writing, perhaps you’d share a bit of your experience in the Comments?
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Freelance Lies . . .


Freelance writing can be very lucrative but demands hard work and intelligent risk-taking.

Freelance Writing

Image courtesy of Svilen Milev ~ http://efffective.com

Back in 2012 I wrote a post called Are Fiction Writers Capable of Freelancing?

 

Today I want to share some info from an article on Business2Community—7 Lies About Freelance Writers You Believe.

I’m only going to list the 7 Lies here—do check out the full article for the Truth :-)

#1 – Freelance writers must have deep tech/industry experience

#2 – Freelance writers need an English or journalism degree to be good

#3 – Freelance writers outsource the work and sit back collecting your money

#4 – Freelance writers are schedule-free spirits

#5 – Freelance writers have an easy job

#6 – Freelance writers overcharge

#7 – Freelance writers have low overhead so it’s all fun and profit

Have you ever freelanced?

Do you freelance now?

Think you’ll freelance in the future?
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Scratch, Scratch, Who’s Got The Money?


I’ve done 22 posts here featuring or mentioning Jane Friedman. ( If you take that link you’ll see this post, #23, since I’m tagging it with her name :-) — just scroll down a bit for the others )

Well, Jane has launched a new magazine that treats of writing and money

If you’re about to click away from this post, from fear of money or fear of writing, please first look at Jane’s Bio—extremely unique and worthy of emulation

She’s teaming up with Manjula Martin—“freelance writer, editor, and communications consultant. She has worked in different editorial capacities with KQED public media, American Conservatory Theater (A.C.T.), Chronicle Books, Zoetrope: All-Story, POZ Magazine, and private clients. As a communications strategist, Manjula has worked with MoveOn.org, California Rural Legal Assistance (CRLA), The Contemporary Jewish Museum, and Net Impact. She collaborates regularly with branding firms Aid & Abet, Free Range, and Mission Minded.”

Scratch is a quarterly and will cost $20/year (with a discount if you subscribe before the first “official” edition in January) but with Jane and Manjula as editors it should be well worth the cost.

Also, they’ve released a first edition of Scratch that’s Free.

Here’s Jane revealing the purpose of Scratch:

“Very few people or publications speak openly about the economic realities of the publishing business. In our bare-it-all media culture, frank talk about money remains taboo. Writers often lack the context or insight to understand our own industry, even as that industry undergoes massive structural and economic changes. Scratch provides a home for open and sustained discussion of these experiences through high-quality content. Yes, we publish advice for writers—but we also go further, investigating the nuances of writers’ relationships to money, work, and publishing.”

Scratch will have an ongoing column called Who Pays Writers which, even though Scratch costs money, will be free to access. Here’s their description of that column:

“Who Pays Writers…collects and reports information from writers about how much magazines and websites pay. We post these reports pretty much as you submit them. We seek to be informational, not judgmental.”

Scratch also has a blog. Here’re some of the first posts’ titles ( with links :-) :

Construction Pays, Writing Doesn’t

A note on the experience of being edited

Adam Weinstein on the un-specialness of feeling poor

Atlantic’s Guide for Freelancers

Congruity: about writing and money when you’re young and a girl

I think they’re going to be rather innovative with the structure of the blog

A final word from Jane:

“If you find Scratch’s content useful, then I hope you’ll subscribe before the first issue releases in January—you’ll get a special rate if you do. Or, if a subscription isn’t for you, but you’d still like to support our mission, then consider a donation.”
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Are Fiction Writers Capable of Freelancing?


“Creative” and “Fiction” might be considered somewhat synonymous when used as adjectives for the word “Writer”.

“Freelance” is not as often associated with the act of writing fiction.

I’m stepping way out on a limb in this post since I don’t know of profitable avenues for Creative/Fiction writers to pursue in the arena of the freelancers.

What seems more natural is for a writer of fiction to use their creativity in freelancing as a non-fiction, money-making “day job”.

In my previous post, Simple Question ~ Can Writers Make Money?, I quoted Chris Brogan from his ponderings on writers making money:

“The money for fiction authors? Oh, I forgot that part. That doesn’t work. Fiction is about passion except for the very few percent of the herd who really can move books like no one’s business.”

Perhaps

Perhaps, not

I would like to propose a challenge to Creative/Fiction Writers.

I wonder how many won’t take the challenge because they’re right where I am—working too hard on writing the fiction I must write to consider writing fiction for others

Also, I wonder how many people can conceive of the idea of freelancing fiction.

Is there a market?

Why would folks want or need a freelancer to create fictional copy for them?

And, I should point out, I’m not considering ghost writers here, unless, of course, they receive their pay regardless of the book being published

If you’re enterprising enough and have the time, would you even consider discovering a freelance market for fiction writers?

If you want an even greater challenge, consider creating such a market, fostering it, making it come alive

For those of you who would rather freelance non-fiction (and, for the enterprising who might consider discovering or creating a market for fiction freelancing), the site Write.com provides a potential resource (or, model).

From a press release:

“Write.com introduces students, professional writers and freelance writers to writing jobs available through Amazon Mechanical Turk. Writers are also able to choose writing jobs that meet their interests and advance their career through a tiered system designed to promote writers for quality and reliability.

“According to Stephanie Leffler, CEO of CrowdSource, ‘We employ a recognition system modeled after offline career paths to motivate and reward our best writers. Those who compose quality work are able to earn a position as an editor. Editors who do a good job can earn a promotion to editorial trainer and so on.’”

So

Have I pointed toward a resource you might consider using?
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Authors Want Readers & Need Money . . .


My recently published book is for sale and I’m still giving away free final manuscripts

I need money and that’s why the book is for sale

I want readers and that’s one reason I still give it away

The second reason I still give it away is summed up in a past post: Free = Sales ~ Give It Away & Sell More…

Naturally, there are other ways for writers to make money with their art/craft.

Let me, by way of introduction, paste an About Page:

“Wrylilt is a 25 year old married mother of one.

“She lives in Queensland, Australia.

“She’s currently one course away from completing a Diploma of Arts in Journalism.

“She worked in retail and administration up until March 2011 and is now working at home full time on her websites, articles and first book.”

I met this woman in the virtual world Second Life and I recommend you visit her website for some ideas on how to turn writing into necessary cash

If nothing else, check out her Tips, Tricks, and Guides page :-)

BTW, I don’t think this woman’s site is just for budding or seasoned fiction writers, or even for only those who aspire to journalism. Her ideas can be used by anyone who has something to say
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