Notes from An Alien

~ Explorations In Reading, Writing, and Publishing ~

Tag Archives: Roz Morris

Read Two of Roz Morris’ Novels for Free ~ limited time offer…


I just received these words in my email from my favorite-blogger-to-Reblog, Roz MorrisRoz Morris

“Hello! Last month I promised you codes to try an exciting ebook subscription service – and they’ve just landed in my inbox! Bookmate specialises in fiction and has a hand-curated collection from the major imprints and also from indies like me. As you can see, they’ve made me a rather strange landing page …

“Anyway, it should be dead simple. Follow the link and if you’re asked for a code, it’s ROZMORRIS. And it will work for any title you want, not just mine!”

I recommend you read Roz’s books—they’re exceedingly good.

Since we live in a global corporate culture, you’ll have to enter information from a credit card—this gives you a month of free reading (I still recommend you concentrate on Roz’s books...); and, they say you can “unsubscribe” at any time—I recommend just before the month is up, unless you want another month at $9.99

And, you can get Roz’s absolutely fantastic book Nail Your Novel (for a limited time) on Amazon, USA for only $1.99.  This book is worth Way more than that!

Click these two images to read the book descriptions:

My Memories of a Future Life

Lifeform Three

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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If you don’t see a way to comment (or, “reply”) after this post, try up there at the top right…
Read Some Strange Fantasies
Grab A Free Novel…
Visit The Story Bazaar

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Google Author Page
For Private Comments or Questions, Email: amzolt {at} gmail {dot} com

Flash News — Special Amazon Deal on Important Book for Writers


I just received an email from a person who’s appeared in this blog many times, through re-blogs… Nail Your Novel

Roz Morris just sent me this message:

“Hello! This is a very quick email to let you know that Amazon has chosen Nail Your Novel for a special Kindle deal.

“Instead of the usual price of USD3.99  it’s now only USD1.99 (I think they add VAT so it’s actually a little over $2, but still quite a saving). 

“I’ve no idea how long this offer lasts for, so grab it now!”

Yes! If you’re a writer or want to be one, Grab This Book!!
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If you don’t see a way to comment (or, “reply”) after this post, try up there at the top right…
Read Some Strange Fantasies
Grab A Free Novel…
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Google Author Page
For Private Comments or Questions, Email: amzolt {at} gmail {dot} com

What is “Author Voice” ?


To start today’s exploration of Author Voice, I’ll excerpt a bit from a post I published in November 2013—How Do Writers Find Their “Voice”? 

Author's Voice

Image Courtesy of Svilen Milev ~ http://efffective.com/

“For those of you who’ve never considered what a writer’s Voice is, Wikipedia has a decent definition:

“’The writer’s voice is the individual writing style of an author, a combination of idiotypical usage of syntax, diction, punctuation, character development, dialogue, etc., within a given body of text (or across several works).”

“And, whoever wrote that definition (or, considering it’s Wikipedia, however many people worked on editing that definition) it has a peculiar Voice since it uses a completely non-typical word (not even in my Oxford dictionary)—’idiotypical’…”

And, in December of 2014, I published the post: The Writer’s Voice ~ More Than A Certain “Style”…

That one has a valuable video; however, the video is about qualities of voice in speaking

I say this about that:

“…I am a writer and I find using the tool of Analogical Comparison, applied to other arts, is a valuable source of learning in my art—painting and music are also great for this creative-borrowing of tools…”

I use a different flavor of Analogical Comparison in a post I published in October 2012—Can Writing Poetry Help An Author Find Their “Voice”?

This is the beginning of that post:

“Writer’s Voice is one of those terms that seems to change its meaning depending on who’s talking about it—almost as if ‘Writer’s Voice’ were capable of sensing who’s writing about it and letting that author’s Voice decide what ‘Writer’s Voice’ means…”

And, to round out the information in those posts, here’s a video about Author Voice with Joanna Penn (she’s “written 21 books and sold over 500,000 books in 84 countries and 5 languages”) and Roz Morris (“professional writer, editor, and writing blogger”—“sold more than 4 million copies of books worldwide”) ENJOY!

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If you don’t see a way to comment (or, “reply”) after this post, try up there at the top right…
Read Some Strange Fantasies
Grab A Free Novel…
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Google Author Page
For Private Comments or Questions, Email: amzolt {at} gmail {dot} com

#MainStreetWriters ~ Moving Forward


I started promoting Main Street Writers Movement on the 12th of February with a re-blog by Roz Morris, where she said the Movement is, “…a campaign that aims to represent the work of literary writers, small presses, independent bookshops and anyone who struggles to be heard or find their audiences.” Main Street Writers Movement

The next day, I did a full-on post about Main Street Writers Movement and I urge all the following folks to go to that last link and find out what’s going on:

“Writers, readers, booksellers, publishers, editors, publicists, agents, and anyone who wants to participate in the literary conversation.”

Since then, there’s been a post on their site from author Kate Ristau about Building Writer Relationships, which I’ll do a bit of excerpting from:

“Writing is lonely. For many of us introverts, spending the day by ourselves, sitting at a computer, maybe not even taking a shower, is . . . awesome! Am I right?”

“But occasionally, even I want to get out of my shell – to peek my head out and see what’s on the other side of my computer. And sometimes, I need more support than my dog.”

“…how do you build your own writing community? How do you find other writers and hang out with them in a not-weird way?”

She then goes on to list four ways to engage in Community…

And, if you go to their Pledge page, you’ll find this line of reasoning for forming Community:

“These are scary and uncertain times, but we must continue to use our voices and to listen to our neighbors’ words….The Main Street Writers Movement urges experienced writers to strengthen the national literary ecosystem through passionate engagement at the local level. Let’s honor and amplify our communities’ underrepresented voices. Let’s buy from local bookstores and small presses. Let’s leave our houses and dance in the streets to the sound of each other’s words.”

Plus, a few days ago, I received the first Main Street Writers Movement Newsletter, which had valuable information from a literary agent, a sharing from Laura Stanfill (Founder of the Movement), and this rousing statement:

“If you’ve been waiting for years for someone to give you permission to join the parade instead of waving your flag from the sidewalk, here’s your letter of recommendation, your megaphone, or (if you’re a pessimist) your umbrella. It’s time to get off the sidewalk. Let’s go. Let’s do this together.”

If I’ve piqued your interest in the Main Street Writers Movement, do check out my full post with all the details

I should also link to the hashtag you can follow on Twitter — #mainstreetwriters  and, if you’re in the USA, check out this site for getting in touch with folks in your neighborhood — NextDoor

Though, I truly hope folks from places other than the USA will leave a few comments on engaging in Literary Community in their own countries…

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If you don’t see a way to comment (or, “reply”) after this post, try up there at the top right…
Read Some Strange Fantasies
Grab A Free Novel…
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Google Author Page
For Private Comments or Questions, Email: amzolt {at} gmail {dot} com

Main Street Writers Movement ~~~ for: “Everyone who wishes more people were reading and talking about literature.“


Main Street Writers Movement

This Movement is for, “Everyone who wishes more people were reading and talking about literature.”

Yesterday, I posted a re-blog by Roz Morris about the Main Street Writers Movement.

She touched on all the top reasons to be interested, whether you’re a writer, publisher, or reader.

But, I thought I’d add my voice to Roz’s, since most of my visitors come from Google searches, meaning they could hit this post and never see Roz’s…

I’m going to share the kinds of folks you’d encounter in the Movement and their Pledge; but, I’ll clear up a small confusion first.

In Roz’s post she said, “There’s a pledge (which, alas, you can only sign if you have 5-digit zip code), but you can register separately for the blog and the newsletter.”

Laura Stanfill ~ Author & Publisher

Laura Stanfill ~ Author & Publisher

The woman behind the Movement, Laura Stanfill, of Forest Avenue Press,  has told me (in an email response):

“You ‘signed the pledge’ by filling out the form [Join The Main Street Writers Movement], which subscribed you to the monthly Main Street Writers Movement newsletter and made you a Main Street writer who has pledged to build community.”

So, there is a Pledge page; and, there is still a place to put a zip code (for those in the USA); but, Join The Main Street Writers Movement has the proper form to join the movement and pledge your efforts if you’re not in the United States.

So, here comes the Pledge:

I pledge…

  1. To encourage my neighbor writers in the creation of art.
  1. To attend local literary events, because gathering to discuss ideas and encourage creativity is an essential and radical act in these times.
  1. To support my independent bookstore or, if I don’t have one, order direct from the publisher.
  1. To foster a healthy small press and literary magazine climate by reading new work and submitting my own.
  1. To introduce new friends to my core community, allowing us to grow louder and stronger together.
  1. To credit writers and presses publicly for their ideas, photos, and efforts, and to be genuine with praise.
  1. To celebrate every success in my community as a shared success. This is Main Street. Parades welcome.

Are those things you can pledge?

Are those things you can let others know about?

Once again, you can “sign the Pledge“, if you’re in the U.S.A.; or, do essentially the same thing if you’re outside the U.S.A., by filling out the form <— right there; which gets you the newsletter as well as, “…earning you access to literary community building tools, industry insights, and connections with #mainstreetwriters who are creating new opportunities in their cities.”

Is the Pledge talking about things we need?

I certainly think so; and, Laura’s reasons are powerful:

“The Main Street Writers Movement urges experienced writers to strengthen the national literary ecosystem through passionate engagement at the local level. Let’s honor and amplify our communities’ underrepresented voices. Let’s buy from local bookstores and small presses. Let’s leave our houses and dance in the streets to the sound of each other’s words.”

So…

Do check out all the links I’ve shared; and, even if you’re not a writer, you can still join; and, even if you’re not in the U.S.A., you can still join ( Roz Morris said, “Laura’s vision is for a number of hubs around the US with live events and networking, but if you’re not one of her geographical neighbours, don’t be put off. Wherever your desk is (I’m waving to you from London), we can blog, tweet, share, meet IRL (heavens!). And support each other to do what we must do.”)

So…

Here’s who should consider aligning with this new Movement:

“Writers, readers, booksellers, publishers, editors, publicists, agents, and anyone who wants to participate in the literary conversation.”

And, toward the bottom of this page on the site, there are more detailed descriptions of the Who (which I will now truncate; but, urge you to go read in their glorious fullness…):

“Writers whose voices are underrepresented”…

“Introverted writers”…

“Writers who have spent five or more years working on the craft and are frustrated”…

“Established writers”…

“go-to writers”…

“Debut authors”…

“Angry writers”…

“Feeling-ignored writers”…

“Writers who are tired of writing fluffy reviews about books they don’t particularly like due to a sense of obligation”…

“Those who are tired of staring at screens”…

“The writers who start podcasts and reading series, create publishing houses and literary magazines, volunteer for literary organizations, and those who stay up-to-date on the industry”…

“Publishers, agents, editors, and publicists”…

“Indie booksellers”…

“Readers”…

Everyone who wishes more people were reading and talking about literature.

Check out All the Main Street Writers Movement Posts :-)

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If you don’t see a way to comment (or, “reply”) after this post, try up there at the top right…
Read Some Strange Fantasies
Grab A Free Novel…
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Google Author Page
For Private Comments or Questions, Email: amzolt {at} gmail {dot} com