Notes from An Alien

~ Explorations In Reading, Writing, and Publishing ~

Tag Archives: LitWorld

Literacy Crisis Looming?


My parents didn’t encourage me to read.

literacy

Image courtesy of http://www.HortonGroup.com

They only read to get along in life.

I encouraged myself and became an eager reader.

I was infected by the literacy bug—not sure where I caught it

Yet, looking beyond my own horizon, I see that, even though self-publishing is flooding the world with books and e-readers are breaking sales records, there are issues brewing about children’s literacy.

I have a number of posts on this blog about literacy—mostly concerning under-developed countries.

I went searching for information on developed countries but only found obvious concern in the USA.

If any of my readers in other countries can point me toward literacy crises where they live, it would be greatly appreciated

Still, I can’t help but feel that if literacy is lagging in the USA, odds are there’s concern elsewhere.

Here’s a representative sampling of what I found:

Report: Two-thirds of ND children aren’t proficient readers by fourth grade

“Two-thirds of North Dakota’s children aren’t proficient readers by the time they reach fourth grade, and the results are worse for the state’s low-income students, with nearly four out of five not hitting proficient reading marks…”

Fourth grade reading skills improve, still low

“Slightly more fourth graders nationwide are reading proficiently compared to a decade ago, but only a third of them are now reading well, according to a new report. The study also found the reading skills gap between children from lower-income and higher-income families has grown, and proficiency varies considerably across states.”

Study finds Wisconsin’s low-income, minority fourth graders trailing in reading proficiency

“Roughly two-thirds of students in Wisconsin entering fourth grade are not reading at a proficient level and low-income and minority students are faring far worse than their higher-income and white classmates, according to a national study released Tuesday.”

Hawaii’s low-income students struggle in reading

“For decades, research has shown the importance of reading proficiently by the end of third grade. It’s more than a critical milestone; it’s a crucial marker in a child’s educational development, one that shows that they’ve transitioned from learning to read to using reading to learn. Those who don’t read well and fall behind by this grade rarely catch up. They’re more likely to drop out of high school and not be as economically successful in adulthood.”

There are many theories floating around out there for why kids are stumbling in their literary journey—some stopping long before they even approach the magnificent realms of compelling literature

In under-developed countries, the main obstacle is a sheer lack of books.

In developed countries, it could be any or all of the following:

  • Poor teaching/administration (and, many excellent teachers are hobbled by rotten administrations)
  • Unimaginative reading proficiency goals
  • Concentration on rote learning rather than true education
  • Insufficient awareness of individual learning styles
  • Class and race prejudice

Anyone reading this post with front-line experience is more than welcome to share in the comments

I’ll leave you with a list of organizations I’ve found who are working to raise literacy levels:

Management Systems International

X Prize for Global Literacy

LitWorld

Worldreader

GoneReading

If you know of others (especially programs in developed countries) please, do, share in the Comments :-)
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EDIT: One of our readers from Germany has left a comment and included a link to a literacy projecct in her country called iCHANCE :-)
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Do You Read Out Loud?


“Read me a story!”

The cry of children—all over the world—yet, over 250 million kids can’t read or write

Last March, I woke up to a challenge and featured a post about LitWorld‘s World Read Aloud Day and how You can help:

“For these children, for all of us, the stories inside books are more than a gentle escape.
They are a life raft.”

Are you able to do any of the following?

I will celebrate independently (spreading the word, hosting an event, as a guest reader, with my friends or family, etc.)

I will celebrate with my school (as a teacher, student, administrator, author, librarian, etc.)

I represent an organization that is interested in partnering with LitWorld for World Read Aloud Day 2013

Watch The Video Below :-)

“Every year on the first Wednesday of March LitWorld’s advocacy campaign for the human right of literacy calls worldwide attention to the importance of reading aloud and sharing stories.”

It’s fun, it’s simple and it changes the world: Read aloud with us.
Spread the word about World Read Aloud Day to family and friends and on your social networking sites.
Read aloud with loved ones or new friends and tally your minutes. Find a sponsor to pledge a donation for the number of minutes you read.
Download LitWorld’s free activity and event kit and host an event in your community, classroom, home or workplace. Connect with friends near and far to grow the movement worldwide.
litworld.org  facebook  twitter  youtube


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“…resilience, hope, and joy through the power of story.”


We all like stories.

We all tell stories.

The quote in the title of this post is from the mission statement of LitWorld.

Back in March, for World Read Aloud Day, I shared some info about LitWorld—Reading Out Loud . . .

This time I’ll share this wonderful opportunity from LitWorld’s site:

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Support LitWorld by shopping at AmazonSmile. Here’s how:

1. Head to smile.amazon.com and log in with the same email address and password as your regular Amazon account, or open a new account if you are a first time shopper. Note: Your purchases must be made through smile.amazon.com to be eligible for a charitable donation.

2. On your first visit to AmazonSmile, you will be prompted to select a charitable organization to receive donations from eligible purchases before you begin shopping. Type LitWorld in the search box. The search result will return “LitWorld International Inc.” Click “select.”

AmazonSmile will remember your selection, and every eligible purchase you make will result in a donation. You may also want to add a bookmark to AmazonSmile to make it even easier to return and start your shopping at AmazonSmile.

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I also want to let you know LitWorld has LitClubs:

“LitWorld believes that everyone has stories that can change the world. Literacy should be meaningful to each individual in the context of their own hopes and dreams.

“The child who values her own stories will use them to create new ideas and new ways of thinking. LitClubs are pioneering integrated approaches that value the story, the creative spirit and the holistic lives of children.”

And, one last (but not LitWorld’s last) worthy endeavor—Innovation Hubs:

“LitWorld Innovation Hubs center our resources in local communities where we engage in deep and strong partnerships, working together to improve outcomes in literacy, personal empowerment, and inter-generational leadership and civic engagement around reading and writing.

“The Hubs provide versatile learning spaces for children and young adults as well as their families, support LitWorld’s educational programming, and offer lending libraries, providing community members with comprehensive access to high quality texts that inspire them to read more regularly. Our hubs offer community members of all ages extensive leadership training, and real opportunities topractice and refine their these capabilities.”

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I’m hoping you’ll go visit LitWorld and hoping you’ll come back and share your thoughts and feelings in our Comments

But, before you go (or, after you come back) watch this video of the Founder of LitWorld, Pam Allyn:


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Select as many as you like:

Reading Out Loud . . .


What are you doing on March 6th, 2013?

It’s a Wednesday

Are you an author, or a reader, or a publisher, or a teacher, or just an ordinary kind of person?

Ever read a book aloud—to other people?

Ever thought reading aloud to others can be a form of aiding literacy??

I have two other posts on this blog that deal with literacy:

E-Readers Can Be A Saving Grace . . .

It’s Simple. They’re Gone Reading :-)

Ever heard of LitWorld?

Their slogan is “Words Changing Worlds“.

O.K., back to March 6th

Oh!  First, a fact and a good thought from LitWorld:

“Worldwide at least 793 million people remain illiterate.”

Imagine a world where everyone can read…”

Now

An Announcement:

World Read Aloud Day: March 6, 2013

And, You Can Help!

From LitWorld’s Site:

“World Read Aloud Day is about taking action to show the world that the right to read and write belongs to all people. World Read Aloud Day motivates children, teens, and adults worldwide to celebrate the power of words, especially those words that are shared from one person to another, and creates a community of readers advocating for every child’s right to a safe education and access to books and technology.

“By raising our voices together on this day we show the world’s children that we support their future: that they have the right to read, to write, and to share their words to change the world.

It’s time to join the Global Literacy Movement

“Accomplished so far:
• Reached 35 countries and 40,000 participants on March 3, 2010
• Reached 60 countries and all 50 states and 200,000 participants on March 9, 2011
• Reached 65 countries and hundreds of thousands of participants on March 7, 2012″

Don’t think you can help?

Are you able to do any of the following?

I will celebrate independently (spreading the word, hosting an event, as a guest reader, with my friends or family, etc.)

I will celebrate with my school (as a teacher, student, administrator, author, librarian, etc.)

I represent an organization that is interested in partnering with LitWorld for World Read Aloud Day 2013

Head on over to LitWorld’s Sign-Up Page (even if all you can do is tell one other person) and let them know you care


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