Notes from An Alien

~ Explorations In Reading, Writing, and Publishing ~

WordPress Can’t Re-Blog & Amazon Has A Soul?


I recently reset my blogging schedule to more neatly accommodate the rest of my writing-life… 

I research and write an original blog post on Monday, Wednesday, and Friday—the other days of the week I re-blog

Well, it’s Thursday and, for no known reason, I can’t find the re-blog buttons

[ Edit after publication: WordPress changed the location of the buttons and, for no known reason, I didn’t see an “alert” about the change…]

So, to bow to my responsibility to my readers, I’m pausing my other writing tasks to manually say:

Check out Jo Robinson’s post, Amazon—she’s trying her hand at Flash Fiction and would appreciate some feedback
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Read Some Strange Fantasies
Grab A Free Novel…
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To Leave A Comment, Use The Link At The Top-Right of The Post :-)
For Private Comments or Questions, Email: amzolt {at} gmail {dot} com

Book Recommendations to Stir Your Imagination and Perk-Up Your Creativity


There’s an organization called TED that shares video talks that are, usually, extremely interesting; and, often enough, quite amazing.

From TED’s history page:

“TED was born in 1984 out of Richard Saul Wurman’s observation of a powerful convergence among three fields: technology, entertainment and design. The first TED included a demo of the compact disc, the e-book and cutting-edge 3D graphics from Lucasfilm, while mathematician Benoit Mandelbrot demonstrated how to map coastlines using his developing theory of fractal geometry.”

Well, TED’s blog had an article entitled, Your summer reading list: 70+ book picks from TED speakers and attendees; and, even though summer is more than half over (in the Northern Hemisphere…), I’m going to share a few of those books with you.

There are ten categories, each with a number of books—I’ll pick two books from eight of the categories and let the truly curious take the link to the article (there are also brief “reviews” for each book in the full article)

Mind-bending fiction, picked by David Eagleman

Labyrinths by Jorge Luis Borges

Invisible Cities by Italo Calvino

Books on art and race, picked by Anne Pasternak

Who We Be: The Colorization of America by Jeff Chang

Uncommon Grounds: New Media and Critical Practices in North Africa and the Middle East edited by Anthony Downey

Illuminating nonfiction, picked by Bill Gates

Making the Modern World: Materials and Dematerialization by Vaclav Smil

How to Lie with Statistics by Darrell Huff and Irving Geis

Incredible interviews, picked by Dave Isay

Maus: A Survivor’s Tale by Art Spiegelman

Just Mercy: A Story of Justice and Redemption by Bryan Stevenson

Haunting novels, picked by Ava DuVernay

The God of Small Things by Arundhati Roy

A Small Place by Jamaica Kincaid

Books on historical moments, picked by David Rothkopf

A Problem from Hell: America and the Age of Genocide by Samantha Power

My Promised Land: The Triumph and Tragedy of Israel by Ari Shavit

Books on creativity, picked by Tony Fadell

How Children Succeed: Grit, Curiosity, and the Hidden Power of Character by Paul Tough

Creativity, Inc.: Overcoming the Unseen Forces That Stand in the Way of True Inspiration by Ed Catmull

Thought-provoking fiction, picked by Nadia Goodman

Boy, Snow, Bird by Helen Oyeyemi

How to Get Filthy Rich in Rising Asia by Mohsin Hamid

Happy Reading :-)

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Read Some Strange Fantasies
Grab A Free Novel…
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
To Leave A Comment, Use The Link At The Top-Right of The Post :-)
For Private Comments or Questions, Email: amzolt {at} gmail {dot} com

In Which Self-publishing Cycle-stage Are You?


Alexander M Zoltai:

Thinking of Self-Publishing?

You’ll need a lot of help; and, this re-blog from one of my favorite publishers has some good advice…

Originally posted on FastPencil.com Self-Publishing Blog:

Screen Shot 2015-04-09 at 8.55.07 AM

Partner with FastPencil for help during any stage of the self-publishing lifecycle. Complete your book project professionally, and stick to your desired budget.

CONNECT

1. Find your audience, create buzz, fund your project. Raise funds, collect pre-orders, market your book and gauge audience interest, all before you publish. Amazon’s Author Central is a great place to start.

CREATE

2. Create your project and collaborate for free on our writing platform. Invite your team to share ideas, track revisions and discuss within your FastPencil workspace.

PUBLISH

3. Instantly preview and publish your book and e-book. ISBNs are assigned (which are yours forever).

SELL

4. Sell to hundreds of bookstores. Publications are distributed to the FastPencil Marketplace, Amazon, Barnes & Noble and NOOK, Apple’s iBooks and Ingram Digital Group Network (hundreds of domestic and international channels) for up to 3 years. Learn more about Publishing & Distribution options, here.

CONNECT

5…

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Something for #Readers & #Writers . . .


This blog is like me—more maverick than classifiable

I report on Reading, Writing, and Publishing on Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays.

I Re-Blog others’ posts on those three topics the other days of the week.

I am an author and I like to give my stuff away (see the left side-bar…).

Of course, if you’re a regular visitor, you know all this; but, I get most of my traffic from unsuspecting folks putting words into search engines

There are two other kinds of bloggers who authors and readers especially like—Book-Bloggers & Bloggers-Who-Do-Book-Reviews—sometimes a person is really both but some folks want to be one or the other (and, finding clear definitions for either is difficult…)

I’ll share two sites that cater to these types of blogs.

First, The Book Blogger List:

What they say about themselves:

“We have created this site to help book bloggers find like-minded bloggers and help authors find book bloggers that might be interested in their book.”

I’m really surprised they don’t mention Readers………

Perhaps they feel it’s way too obvious that a reader would like a place to find blogs about books…?

Now, their “rules”:

“Instructions for Authors

“This database of book bloggers is organized by genre of interest. If a book blogger has expressed interest in multiple genres, they will be listed in each category. Any book blogger that is listed here has asked to be listed.  Keep in mind that when approaching a book blogger about your book, use your manners and your common sense. Don’t approach a blogger who only reads children’s lit to read your non-fiction business book. Choose bloggers that are interested in your genre.”

“Instructions for Book Bloggers

“This is a site for you to list your book blog as well as find some bloggy friends. All the entries will be checked every two months. If your blog has not been posted to during those two months, your listing will be removed. If you are taking a blogging break – or going on a really long vacation, let us know and we won’t pull your listing.”

Now, let’s take a look at The Indie View.

First, “Indie” generally means “not from the big, old, traditional publishers”

The Indie View has three main sections:

Latest Indie Book Reviews from Around the Web

A List of Folks Who Review Indie Books

A List of Authors Who’ve Rated High in Indie Reviews

If you’re a writer looking for reviews, use their main link and scroll the right side-bar for Registration Requirements.

And, partly because there are so many book-blogs and partly because I want this post to be of value, here’s one more place to visit:

http://bookblogging.net/
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Read Some Strange Fantasies
Grab A Free Novel…
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
To Leave A Comment, Use The Link At The Top-Right of The Post :-)
For Private Comments or Questions, Email: amzolt {at} gmail {dot} com

The Muse Needs Exercise as Much as the Body


Alexander M Zoltai:

If you’re a writer, you may have already seen the advice this Re-Blog offers…

…but…

…it does bear repeating………

Originally posted on Live to Write - Write to Live:

We all know that it’s important to exercise our bodies. But it’s also as important to exercise the muse.

Without exercise, the body can waste away, get used to inactivity to the point where it doesn’t want to do anything, or even stop working all together.

The writing muse is similar — without regular activity, the muse will get bored, turn its back on you when you call, or not respond at all.Exercise the muse (1)

As with physical exercise, you want to start slow and build up. With a sudden burst of I’m-getting-in-shape-once-and-for-all, you can head off to the gym and lift weights and get an hour of cardio in and feel fabulous, and then be so sore you can barely move the next few days.

Likewise, if writing inspiration hits and 7,000 words pour onto a page in a day, you can feel quite energized, maybe even imagine your worldwide book…

View original 409 more words

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