Notes from An Alien

~ Explorations In Reading, Writing, and Publishing ~

Top 10 Homes in Middle-Grade Fiction by Keir Graff


Today’s re-blog is something certain aspiring writers might be able to use to envision who they might want to write for…

Nerdy Book Club

Homes are important in kids’ books, probably because visiting other people’s houses awakens our first wonderings about how other people live—and, by inference, how we might live once we get to make decisions about such things. (Imagining others’ circumstances also has a lot to do with the development of empathy, too.) I’ve spent a lot of time lately talking about the real-life inspirations for my new middle-grade novel, The Matchstick Castle, which had its genesis in my notion of writing a story in which a house was a character. Strangely, it only recently occurred to me to think about the fictional houses that wormed their way into my imagination—or maybe it was the other way around. Please note that this is my top 10, not a claim to being THE top 10, and, with only a couple of exceptions, reflects my 1970s childhood and the titles that were widely read…

View original post 1,392 more words

Advertisements

Ten Fiercely Fabulous Female Heroines by Megan Fink


I think the title of today’s re-blog says it all………

Nerdy Book Club

As a middle school librarian, I see a multitude of readers both eager and reluctant every day in my library.  The female heroines in this book represent a collection of independent and strong-willed characters that demonstrate resilience and persistence that we want our students to emulate.  

 

rook

Rook by Sharon Cameron

Sophia Bellamy is not your average debutante in the Commonwealth and the notorious Red Rook is attempting to rescue prisoners from the dystopian Sunken City (formerly known as Paris).  When a marriage contract is arranged with a wealthy man Rene, Sophia knows she has to agree to save her family’s business.  However, her new fiance has a hidden past and only the mysterious Red Rook can rescue her brother, when evil politicians arrest him for being the Red Rook.  These seem like two opposite storylines, but Sharon Cameron skillfully weaves them together with action and romance reminiscent of…

View original post 1,107 more words

Friday Story Bazaar ~ Tale Sixty-Two


“And Now, the News from Hell…”

by
Alexander M Zoltai

~~~~~~~~~

Today, in a rather small country, a rather young girl was raped.

~~~

Last Friday, fourteen mildly disenfranchised individuals were consigned to solitary confinement for being incapable of adjusting to the norm.

~~~

Twenty-four residents of a middle-eastern country visited twenty-four cities in six countries and blew themselves into history’s shadows.

~~~

An international oversight organization predicts the flow of refugees will double in the next four years.

~~~

Monday will be somewhat sunny, with Tuesday through Saturday offering hurricane conditions.

~~~

Over the past year, in a rather large county, 5,000 12-year-old girls were married to men they barely knew.

~~~

In most major cities in the west, studies show the odds of a woman being killed by her husband are approaching 50%.

~~~

Recent actions by the Oppressors of the imprisoned People of the eastern Mediterranean coast defy rational appraisal but are followed by thinly-veiled propagandistic “news” apologetics.

~~~

Three major studies have been commissioned to delve into issues concerning the mental health of certain heads of state.

~~~

In the past six months, various corporations successfully demolished the economies of nine countries.

~~~

Over the past month, three countries’ military forces, of sea and air, experienced twenty-two close-calls of threat enhancement, with no party to the events claiming intention.

~~~

In a rather large city, there are now 7,000 custom cars that cost more than what it takes to educate 300 children through 3rd grade.

~~~

In the next week, expect most politicians to tell, on average, three lies per day.

~~~

It is estimated that, at any given time, approximately thirty-four priests are actively pursuing sexual abuse.

~~~

Seven residents of three American suburbs visited two metropolises and joined certain middle-eastern history-shadows.

~~~

It has been determined that there are currently six completely private wars that are more than three years old.

~~~

The three states that were slammed by the hurricane will be getting very little government aid.

~~~

We have heard, through sources unnamable, that international technology companies show evidence of sympathy with totalitarianism.

~~~

It has been estimated, by four independent agencies, that there are still thirty million slaves on earth.

~~~

There is no doubt that time is slowing down and threatens to reverse if world leaders don’t address the facts before them.

~~~

We have it, from reliable sources, that this outlet for news from hell will be shut down. It is unclear what will replace it…

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Read More Story Bazaar Tales

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
If you don’t see a way to comment (or, “reply”) after this post, try up there at the top right…
FREE On-line Course in Self-Publishing & Book Promotion
Even though it may say “Fee”, it Really is FREE :-)

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Google Author Page
For Private Comments or Questions, Email: amzolt {at} gmail {dot} com

Why kids can learn more from tales of fantasy than realism


The last line of today’s re-blog:

“And hey, if it’s good for the kids …” :-)

M.C. Tuggle, Writer

Fantasy learning

Deena Weisberg is a senior fellow in psychology at the University of Pennsylvania. Her specialty is “imaginative cognition,” which studies how imagination boosts one’s ability to learn. Her research demonstrates that children absorb new material taught in the context of a fanciful scenario better than they do when it’s presented in more realistic terms. In a recent edition of Aeon, she challenges herself with a question she’s grappled with before: Why do fantastical stories stimulate learning?

What can be going on? Perhaps children are more engaged and attentive when they see events that challenge their understanding of how reality works. After all, the events in these fantastical stories aren’t things that children can see every day. So they might pay more attention, leading them to learn more.

A different, and richer, possibility is that there’s something about fantastical contexts that is particularly helpful for learning. From this perspective, fantastical fiction…

View original post 252 more words

#Writers & #Movies


I wrote a post featuring Movies about Writers back in 2016—it included 12 films. #Writers and #Movies

There’s a more recent post in The Independent Publishing Magazine called, Seven Films About Writers That Will Motivate You.

So…

19 movies about writers…

In one of my past posts, I said:

“…the legendary director and producer, Francis Ford Coppola, said he preferred being inspired by reading short stories rather than movie scripts.”

I’ve also said:

“As a writer, I think watching movies is an excellent way to absorb the craft of storytelling. Even though the approaches differ in certain critical ways, you can ‘translate’ between them.”

So…

Movies about writers and movies for writers…

How about a few videos for writers?

Just go to Aerogramme Writers’ Studio and check out their post, 13 Inspirational TED Talks for Writers.

I’ve included at least four of those videos in past posts; and, I drop one in here for the folks who just hate taking links out from blog posts :-)

Enjoy this talk about storytelling freed from politics, from the author, Elif Shafak :

(very sorry if you have to watch an ad before the video :-( or, heaven forbid, even after the video…)


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
If you don’t see a way to comment (or, “reply”) after this post, try up there at the top right…
Visit The Story Bazaar
FREE On-line Course in Self-Publishing & Book Promotion
Even though it may say “Fee”, it Really is FREE :-)

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Google Author Page
For Private Comments or Questions, Email: amzolt {at} gmail {dot} com