Notes from An Alien

~ Explorations In Reading, Writing & Publishing ~

Tag Archives: Jerry J. Davis

An Author Writes an Open Letter to His Publisher . . .


Jerry J. Davis - Author

Jerry J. Davis

I have a friend named Jerry Davis, an author interviewed here back in 2012.

I recently discovered a fascinating post of his from back in 2014—Open Letter to Hachette CEO, Michael Pietsch.

I think it still has great validity for consideration by writers (and, writer’s friends...).

You may remember it was back when Amazon and Hachette were violently feuding

Here are just a few excerpts (but, do go read the whole thing...):

“Holding onto outdated business models by force is … well, completely backwards and ultimately a doomed path….Resisting the movement to ebooks is not the answer.”

“As a one of your authors who has also released his ebooks independently on Amazon, I have made FAR more sales on my own than with your publishing group. Far more sales, and far more income.”

“I have not seen a penny from my book with you in years, by the way, even though I KNOW it’s selling.

“But that’s beside the point.”

“…for godsake stop using your authors as leverage and accept one of Amazon’s offers to take them out of the middle.”

Even though some folks would say, “What’s the big deal? They stopped fighting.”, the fact that they’re big corporations would certainly make them prone, in today’s business environment, to fighting again.

Plus, one of the smartest publishers around has pointed out some of the possible harm Amazon, itself, may cause authors this year

What’s the solution?

Radical Self-Publishing—> try this post if you’re new to the idea…

Oh! You also might want to check out Jerry Davis’ books :-)
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Author Interview ~ Jerry J. Davis


Every Sunday I walk by a certain house on the beach on my way to the Open Mic on Book Island in the virtual world Second Life.

That house belongs to Groovy Greenberg and is a spacious, open house with artwork on every wall, a large table for lots of friends to gather around, and a fireplace

In Real Life, Groovy’s name is Jerry J. Davis and you can now enjoy our interview :-)

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Jerry, what sparked your interest in writing and what were your earliest influences?

I had a brother nearly 14 years older than myself, and I inherited his whole collection of Hardy Boys, Tom Swift, and Rick Brant books. After I burned through all those, especially the Rick Brant books (they were the unofficial basis for the Johnny Quest cartoon series) I was quite unhappy there were no more of them. So, I started writing my own. I was maybe 11 or 12 years old, and would sit up almost all night long banging away on my old manual Sears typewriter.

What did you ever do with those?

I burned them.

You burned them?!

Yep, all those, and just about every other thing I wrote between 11 and 19. Decided I needed a fresh start, so I burned them. I ended up doing the same thing again later in life as well. People tend to cling to things in their writers trunk, hoping they will someday be pulled out, dusted off, and published. For me, it’s better to get rid of all those ghosts and just move forward. The best parts of them, you never lose — they get resurrected in new forms. Whether you know it or not. You steal your own ideas all the time, and they’re always better after they’ve been steeping in your brain for a while.

When did you first get published and what was it?

A silly little story, back then what they called a “short short” but now called “flash fiction”, was published in an anthology when I was about 23. It was over seven years before I got anything else published — two of my short stories made it into the Aboriginal Science Fiction magazine in the 1990s, and then a string of publications followed sporadically after that.

You’ve got some books out. Can you tell us about them?

Well, my first one was called “Travels,” and my best thumbnail description of it is to say its a Science Fiction version of Revelations from the Bible. But it’s also about how TV has pretty much sucked our souls out of our bodies through our eyeballs.

So, it’s a type of cyber-apocalyptic Sci-Fi novel?

Pretty much, yes. You have the televised second coming of Christ, an Antichrist who is a computer program, and a band of holy hackers trying to prevent the end of the world.

Whoot! :-)  What came after that?

I collected together all my published short stories, rewrote them to bring them up to date, combined them with some other stories I’d been working on but just never sent out, and put them out on the Kindle and Nook as an anthology. Coming up with a title for that was a bit of a challenge, so I just took the common threads from all of them and put it out as “God, Time, Perception and Sexy Androids.” Because inside you’ll find a lot of stories about each of those topics.

Sexy androids?

For some reason I was fascinated by them for a while. Kind of like the Japanese seem to be.

Do you see sexy androids in our future?

Definitely. Think, “ultimate stealth bomb.”

O.K., gotta think that over…  Uh… Religion also seems to be a common thread in your stories.

Yes. The concept of religion and all its facets — good and bad — is another thing that fascinates me, and I feel Science Fiction is the perfect, safe medium to explore things you couldn’t normally explore without pissing a lot of people off. That’s also where the “perception” part of the title blends in.

How about time? Can readers expect some time travel stories?

How can any book of science fiction stories not have its share of fun time travel adventures?

Is that what your latest book is about? Eleven Days on Earth?

Nope, no time travel in that one. That is a fantasy novel about the quest for the Holy Beer.

The Holy Beer?

Yes, Beer is the original holy water — and I’m not making this part up — it was used hand-in-hand with religion all the way back to the dawn of civilization, and in fact many historians credit the discovery of beer, or how to make it, was the reason for civilizations in the first place. So the most ancient religions not only had beer as an integral part, but there is even a Sumerian goddess of beer and brewing, and all this was way before wine ever entered the picture. There is even a very good chance that it was actually beer, not wine, that Jesus drank out of the Holy Grail.

So is the Holy Grail part of your story?

Yes. As are several gods and goddesses, the real stories behind them, and how the modern world has caused a precarious balance of power of the supernatural forces which are the underlying support of quantum physics. And along comes this dead guy, sent back to the land of the living by a goddess, on a quest to find the Holy Beer — and his mere presence upsets the balance of power. It was a fun book to write, because  you get to see why Salvador Dali painted all those surrealistic paintings, you get to find out why light is both a wave and a particle, you get to see Katmandu and the island with the Fountain of Youth at the heart of the Bermuda Triangle, and … where all your socks end up when they go missing.

Gee, Jerry, that sounds like a lot of fun! Where can the readers find out more?

I have links to everything, all the books, etc., as well as my photography, blogs, and podcasts, out on my website at JerryJDavis.com.

Thanks for such an enjoyable interview, Jerry! Learned a bit, too :-)

Want to ask Jerry a question in our Comments?
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