Notes from An Alien

~ Explorations In Reading, Writing, and Publishing ~

“I feel it in my fingers…”: Linguistic repetition really is all around


Some beginning writers seem to have received a “rule” that bans word repetition—they end up over-using a thesaurus…

The following re-blogged article explores repetition, first in poetry, then in prose and other forms of speech and writing…

Enjoy :-)

Word Jazz

IMG_5940Seasons come and go, and come back again. History repeats itself. The verses might be different, but the chorus is the same…

Repetition is rife, even in language. Every critic knows that much of what will be said, will already have been said before – probably many times over. But even the staunchest critic might be surprised at just how rife linguistic repetition really is.

Repetition, of course, is a key feature of poetry. Alliteration, assonance and rhyme are the repetition of particular phonemes (consonants and vowels) across a passage of text. Rhythm in poetry, or discourse in general, is the repetition of stress (of pitch, syllable length or volume) and the repetition of a particular time interval. In Berowne’s monologue from Shakespeare’s Love’s Labour’s Lost, for example, the triplet rhythm and terminal rhyme (rather aptly) create sweet, heavenly music:

“For valour, is not love a Hercules,
Still climbing…

View original post 1,268 more words

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