Notes from An Alien

~ Explorations In Reading, Writing & Publishing ~

My Favorite Word is “Word” :-)


I started experimenting with words as a child—harmless activity that had some social benefit.

Now, I’m totally addicted to words and, worst of all, I’ve actually become an author, selling words to others

So, with that tongue-in-cheek opening to this post, is my favorite word really “word”?

Yes!

As a child, I was an avid dictionary reader and swiftly moved on to Etymologies. And, when you look up the word-history of “word” you find it traced back to, well back to speech, talk, utterance, and word!

This self-reflective quality of the word “word” has always made it my favorite.

If you want another perspective on the relationships of words, you could follow the blog, Inky Fool, by Mark Forsyth.

Mark also turned some of his blog into the book, The Etymologicon.

Here’s the elevator pitch from GoodReads:

“The Etymologicon springs from Mark Forsyth’s Inky Fool blog on the strange connections between words. It’s an occasionally ribald, frequently witty and unerringly erudite guided tour of the secret labyrinth that lurks beneath the English language, taking in monks and monkeys, film buffs and buffaloes, and explaining precisely what the Rolling Stones have to do with gardening.”

And, as a favor to my best friend, who’s Australian, here’s Mark explaining the word “Barracking”


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5 responses to “My Favorite Word is “Word” :-)

  1. Simone Benedict March 22, 2012 at 5:07 pm

    Ha ha ha, I didn’t know that about barracking. Fun is right!

    As you’ve seen over at my blog, I’ve been doing some mushing. It too is an interesting word. Wonderful post!

    Like

  2. Jane Watson March 22, 2012 at 10:30 pm

    Haha, thank you Alex! Well I’m barracking for this blog now and for Simone in the Iditarod! (what’s the derivation of Iditarod?!!) I think the derivation of barracking is probably Northern Irish (those Brits imagine we think about them a lot more than we actually do!) but we’ll never know…I found the etymology of ‘mush’ fascinating. Heading over to your blog now Simone to give Richard some moral support…us writers know how it feels to be ‘different’ ;)

    Like

  3. Pingback: Words What Bug Me « HoaiPhai

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